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Pride Season

Pride Season is a term that refers to the wide range of Pride events that take place over the summer (June to September) when LGBTQ2 communities and allies come together to spotlight the resilience, celebrate the talent, and recognize the contributions of LGBTQ2 communities. Although special attention is put on the Pride events during the summer months, they happen throughout the year in many communities.

Historically, Pride gatherings emerged from the first large-scale protests for LGBTQ2 rights. In Canada, the first demonstrations took place in Ottawa and Vancouver in 1971. By 1973, Pride events were held in several Canadian cities, including Montréal, Ottawa, Saskatoon, Toronto, Vancouver and Winnipeg. Toronto's Pride weekend in June is now among the largest Pride events in North America.

Happy Pride Season!

Topics

Pride Season toolkit

Use our digital toolkit to promote Pride Season all summer long. You will find social media images, a virtual background, and much more!

Pride events in Canada

Take part in celebrations and activities in your region.

“We Demand”

Learn more about the first large-scale protests for LGBTQ2 rights in Canada including the "We Demand" Rally.

LGBTQ2 Secretariat

Find out about the work of the Government of Canada to improve equality for LGBTQ2 communities.

Over 50 years of LGBTQ2 activism in Canada

Transcript of the Pride Season Animated Timeline: Over 50 years of LGBTQ2 activism in Canada

Video length: 2:49 minutes

Over 50 years of LGBTQ2 activism in Canada. This timeline provides a few notable event over decades of change. It is by no means a comprehensive list of LGBTQ2 history in Canada.

[Striped band displaying the colours of the Progress Flag. Soft music.]

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A black and white photo of Parliament appears. A text box appears.]

1969. The Government of Canada decriminalized private sexual acts between two people over the age of 21 – a breakthrough in the movement towards treating gay men, lesbians and bisexuals equally under the law.

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A black and white photo of the “We Demand” Rally taken on Parliament Hill appears. A text box appears.]

1971. The “We Demand” Rally was the first large scale demonstration for LGBTQ2 rights in Canada with protests in Ottawa and Vancouver. Photo credit: Jearld F. Moldenhauer

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A black and white photo of a Pride gathering appears. A text box appears.]

1973. Pride gatherings were held in several Canadian cities, including Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Saskatoon, and Winnipeg. Photo credit: Jearld F. Moldenhauer

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[An animation of the Pride Flag and the Quebec Flag appear. A text box appears.]

1977. Quebec became the first jurisdiction in Canada to amend its provincial charter of human rights to include sexual orientation as a prohibited ground for discrimination.

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[Animations of Operation Soap: The police raids that targeted Toronto’s queer community appear. Images of protestors, police officers rummaging through lockers and police officers arresting civilians. A text box appears]

1981. Four bathhouses in Toronto are raided by the Toronto Police in Operation Soap. The event is considered one of the crucial turning points in Canadian LGBTQ2 history. Photo credits: Operation Soap: The police raids that targeted Toronto’s queer community in the 1980s. Youtube – Historica Canada

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A photo of a Trans couple hugging appears. A text box appears.]

1996. Sexual orientation is added to the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A family photo of two women and their daughter appears. A text box appears.]

2000. Parliament passes Bill C-23 which gives same-sex couples the same social tax benefits as heterosexuals in common-law relationships. Photo credits: Mondays with Mac Photography

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A photo of two brides holding hands and wearing white wedding gowns in front of a cloud of rainbow coloured smoke appears. A text box appears]

2005. The enactment of the Civil Marriage Act marked a milestone in sexual orientation equality rights, by allowing same-sex couples to be married anywhere in Canada.

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A photo of people at a Trans March holding signs appears. A text box appears.]

2009. The first Trans March in Canada is organized during Toronto Pride.

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A photo of the Parliament Peace Tower appears. A photo of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau appears. Two text boxes appears.]

2017. Gender expression and gender identity are added to the Canadian Human Rights Act. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivered a historic apology to individuals harmed by federal legislation, policies and practices that led to the oppression of and discrimination against LGBTQ2 people in Canada.

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A photo of a young Trans person appears. A photo of a Trans parent and daughter appear. A text box appears.]

2018. In December 2018, Status of Women Canada became Women and Gender Equality Canada (WAGE) with an expanded mandate that includes the advancement of equality with respect to sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression.

[The photo of the Trans person disappears. The photo of the Trans parent and daughter disappear. A photo of filed paper records appear. A new text box appears.]

2018. Bill C-66 passed unanimously in the House of Commons and in the Senate. Records of convictions involving consensual sexual activity between same-sex partners of legal age can now be destroyed.

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and image on screen fade away.]

[A black and white photo of Gemma Hickey appears. A photo of a mother and daughter appear. Two text boxes appears.]

2019. Gemma Hickey becomes one of the first Canadians to receive a gender-neutral birth certificate and passport. The Government of Canada made a historic $20 million investment to support LGBTQ2 capacity-building projects from coast to coast to coast. Photo credit: Twitter @justbegemma

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and images on screen fade away.]

[An animation of the Progress Flag in movement appears. A text box appears.]

2020-2021. Launch of the public engagement process for developing the first-ever federal LGBTQ2 Action Plan.

[The colourful striped band moves forward while the text and images on screen fade away.]

Over 50 years of LGBTQ2 activism in Canada. This timeline provides a few notable event over decades of change. It is by no means a comprehensive list of LGBTQ2 history in Canada. Striped band displaying the colours of the Progress Flag. Music stops. The Canada wordmark appears, which has a waving Canadian flag above the last “a” in the word “Canada”.

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